Practical Ways to Use Hansen Solubility Parameters

Practical Ways to Use Hansen Solubility Parameters

Ken McCarthy
Clean Room Coating Solutions

One of the challenges in the coating industry is finding a replacement solvent for a formulation. Using Hansen Solubility Parameters, there are ways to find new or better or alternate solvents for most things. This capability is based on work, presentations, and apps developed by Prof. Steven Abbott. First, we will look at some information about Hansen Solubility Parameters. Hansen Solubility Parameters were developed by Charles M. Hansen in his Ph.D thesis in 1967 as a way of predicting if one material will dissolve in another and form a solution. They are based on the idea that like dissolves like, where one molecule is defined as being 'like' another if it bonds to itself in a similar way. Specifically, each molecule is given three Hansen parameters, each generally measured in MPa0.5: dD The energy from dispersion forces between molecules dP The energy from dipolar intermolecular force between molecules dH The energy from hydrogen bonds between molecules

Using Professor Steven Abbott’s methodology, these three Hansen parameters can be plotted in a 3-dimensional space, and then used in a variety of ways. In a rather simple example, if a component to be coated is dissolved in a solvent that becomes a forbidden solvent (due to regulatory action or safety concerns or is no longer being sold), a substitute solvent must be found. In this paper, a method for the use of the Hansen parameters to determine an appropriate solvent (or pair of solvents) will be shown.